Languages
Across the Curriculum

Political World Map (2533K)

Languages Across The Curriculum: An Overview of Course Models

Bruce T. Holl

Trinity University LAC Workshop

May 18, 2009

San Antonio, Texas



I American LAC Models

The one credit course in the target language, taught in conjunction with a three credit English-language course.


The one credit course in a department other than Modern Languages and Literatures, taught in conjunction with a three credit content-based course in the foreign language department

The parallel (or interlocking) course model

The three credit stand-alone course in the target language


The three credit stand-alone bilingual course.

The one credit stand-alone course in the target language


The one credit introductory language course for students in other disciplines


The English-language course with optional readings and discussions in one or more target languages


The English-language course in which everyone reads works in English that incorporate some elements of one or more target languages


The English Literature course that employs foreign-language translations.

Independent study

The Foreign Language Immersion Program (Translation Perspectives VII 103, 110-111).

The Joint Degree program

The Internship

Service Learning


The English-language course in which the teacher introduces some target-language vocabulary (Next Steps 22).


II CBI models for language classrooms (from Stryker and Leaver, Content-Based Instruction and Kecht and von Hammerstein, Languages Across the Curriculum)


III LAC and Language Program Articulation (From Barrette and Paesini, Language Program Articulation and Kecht and von Hammerstein, Languages Across the Curriculum)


IV European Models & Approaches (From Grenfell, Modern Languages Across the Curriculum)


A Immersion Programs




B Teacher-Intensive Models


C Multilingual Classrooms


D Inclusive Courses


V LAC and Citizenship Education (Oster and Starkey, Citizenship and Language Learning)


VI News Developments

A There is a new model at Trinity

A content course, “Brazilian Popular Culture,” has been developed by Rosana Blanco-Cano, that is taught in a second language (Spanish) but includes instruction in a third language (Portuguese).


B MLA Report

The Modern Language Association, an influential professional organization for teachers of English, linguistics, and modern languages, has issued a report that contains a number of recommendations for modern language departments in particular and universities in general:


C Goucher College IICA program


D NEH assessment of LAC














Works Cited



Adams, Thomas M. “Beyond Language and Literature Departments: History, Culture, and International Study.” ADFL Bulletin 38 (2006-2007), 13-21.

Barrette, Catherine M. and Kate Paesani. eds. Language Program Articulation: Developing a Theoretical Foundation. Boston: Thomson Heinle, 2004.

Fichera, Virginia M. and H. Stephen Straight, eds. Translation Perspectives X. Using Languages Across the Curriculum: Diverse Disciplinary Perspectives. Binghamton: Center for Research in Translation, SUNY-Binghamton, 1997.

Grenfell, Michael, ed. Modern Languages Across the Curriculum. London: Routledge Falmer, 2002.

Kecht, Maria-Regina and Katharina von Hammerstein. Languages Across the Curriculum: Interdisciplinary Structuresand Internationalized Education. Columbus: National East Asian Resource Center, 2000.

Krueger, Merle and Frank Ryan, eds. Language and Content: Discipline- and Content-Based Approaches to Language Study. Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath & Co., 1993.

MLA Ad Hoc Committee on Foreign Languages. “Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changing World.” May 2007. <http://www.mla.org/flreport>.

Moreno-Lopez, Isabel, Cristina Saenz-de-Tejada and Tami Kopischke Smith. “Language and Study Abroad Across the Curriculum: An Analysis of Course Development.” Foreign Language Annals 41 (2008), 674-686.

Osler, Audrey and Hugh Starkey, eds. Citizenship and Language Learning: International Perspectives. Stoke on Trent: Trentham Books, 2005.

Shoenberg, Robert E. and Barbara Turlington, eds. Next Steps for Languages Across the Curriculum: Prospects, Problems and Promise. Washington: American Council on Education, 1998.

Shoenberg, Robert E. and Barbara Turlington, eds. Spreading the Word II: Promising Developments for Undergraduate Foreign Language Instruction. Washington: American Council on Education, 1996.

Spinelli, Emily. "Languages Across the Curriculum: A Postsecondary Initiative." ACTFL Newsletter (Fall 1995), 5-8.

Straight, H. Stephen, ed. Translation Perspectives VII. Languages Across the Curriculum: Invited Essays on the Use of Foreign Languages Throughout the Postsecondary Curriculum. Binghamton: Center for Research in Translation, SUNY-Binghamton, 1994.

Stryker, Stephen B. and Betty Lou Leaver, eds. Content-Based Instruction in Foreign Language Education. Washington: Gerogetown UP, 1997.

Suderman, David P. and Mary A. Cisar. "Foreign Language Across the Curriculum: A Critical Appraisal." Modern Language Journal 76 (1992), 295-308.

"Syllabus: Food Science and Nutrition 222 French 222 Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo 'French Food in French.'" Chronicle of Higher Education 46, no. 33 (April 21, 2000).

Trinity University LAC Program. http://www.trinity.edu/bholl/TrinityLacProgram.html